WANT TO JOIN IN ON THE CONVERSATION?

BECOME A MEMBERRegister

Chicago Bears Fan Forum

411 posts / 0 new
Last post
The Shadow
The Shadow's picture
POST COUNT: 9309
Re: Biscuit
0

Analysis from the sixth practice

ByPatrick Finley
 

BOURBONNAIS — The Sun-Times’ Patrick Finley breaks down the Bears’ sixth training-camp practice:

Trubisky ‘testing the waters’

Quarterback Mitch Trubisky threw two interceptions to cornerback Prince Amukamara in a three-play span Thursday — one on an overthrow, then another after a ball tipped off wide receiver Kevin White’s hands.

“Mitch had a couple of interceptions today,” coach Matt Nagy said. “The best part of that was he came back with a completion on the next play. So we’re growing in that process; he’s testing the waters along with the other quarterbacks.”

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

The Shadow
The Shadow's picture
POST COUNT: 9309
Re: Biscuit
0

Five signs of progress: Why Bears believe QB Mitch Trubisky is on right path

ByAdam L. Jahns
 

BOURBONNAIS — As the seconds ticked off the play clock — 7, 6, 5, 4 — quarterback Mitch Trubisky continued to shout new orders to his offense. With one second left, center Cody Whitehair snapped the ball. Trubisky then threw a perfect pass to rookie receiver Anthony Miller, who was streaking down the middle of the field.

It was a big gain in a full team drill — a potential touchdown in a real game — during Trubisky’s best day so far in Bears training camp Monday.

“I would just say it’s clicking,” Trubisky said. “I am feeling that anticipation. The offense is starting to slow down.”

Here are five signs of Trubisky’s progress under new head coach Matt Nagy, as seen through the eyes of quarterbacks coach Dave Ragone, the only holdover on offense from former coach John Fox’s staff:

Learning the language

There’s an old clip from Raiders coach Jon Gruden’s days with the Buccaneers in which Gruden is on quarterback Chris Simms’ case for his inability to recite plays during practice.

“I’m making you nervous, aren’t I?” Gruden says.

“I just couldn’t spit it out,” Simms responds.

Trubisky isn’t having that problem. And Nagy’s play calls, like those in Gruden’s offense, can be complex and long — as much as 16 words.

“There’s some plays that now, when [Trubisky] hears the formation or right when the protection comes out — the first word of the play — he knows it,” Ragone said. “He doesn’t have to hear it again.”

Ragone said Trubisky is starting to display conviction and command. Better yet, he’s able to explain during their reviews why certain plays worked or others didn’t.

“He’s giving back the right answers,” Ragone said. “He’s executing plays that are not just the 101 level, but the next level. Obviously, not everything is down, but he’s making those steady improvements.”

Moving on from mistakes

Trubisky played well Sunday and Monday but also had moments of frustration. On Monday, after slipping on a run, he punted the ball. A day earlier, he rolled the ball toward the sideline after a run play was stuffed.

But it’s what Trubisky did next after those plays that resonated with Ragone. In both instances, he responded with pinpoint throws to Miller down the field.

“The big thing for him when we talk about this is live in the present,” Ragone said. “There’s nothing you can do about that last play. It might not even be your fault. That doesn’t matter.”

That’s partly why Trubisky’s interceptions earlier in camp were never viewed as a major problem. He not only was under orders from Nagy to test the waters, but his coaches wanted to see how he responded to mistakes.

“The more he gets in those adverse situations, you want to see how quickly he responds,” Ragone said. “He’s done that the last couple of days.”

Fixing fundamentals

Trubisky’s mechanics tended to go awry in games last season, when it also didn’t help that he lacked weapons and that Fox’s offensive approach was simplistic. Nagy, a former quarterback and QBs coach, has put a greater emphasis on fundamentals, and Ragone thinks Nagy’s style of offense and Trubisky’s understanding of it will help. The coaching staff is tailoring everything to Trubisky’s strengths.

“In my opinion, your fundamentals tie in to understanding the rhythm of each play,” Ragone said. “So if you understand the rhythm of your drop, when you need to get to the top of your drop, when you need to hitch and when you need to move on, your fundamentals usually fall in place.

“When you’re too fast or too slow, you typically throw your fundamentals off. That’s because you don’t have a really great understanding of the rhythm of each play, and he’s starting to get that.”

Feeling out his receivers

In recent practices, Trubisky has targeted receivers Bennie Fowler and Javon Wims as much as Miller, Allen Robinson and Kevin White. Nagy continues to rotate in different receivers, trying to see who runs which routes well — which can change depending on formations and field position.

“Coach Nagy has done a great job of explaining to Mitchell the importance of understanding the timing of each player and working with them,” Ragone said.

Ragone said he can feel the timing coming together, especially with Miller and Robinson.

“There are some throws you’re like, when he let it go, ‘Oooh,’ ” Ragone said, wincing. “But he understood that’s his guy, and his guy has made plays for him.”

It goes back to testing the waters.

“You want to see what you can get away with in terms of ‘Maybe I can fit that ball in there’ or ‘[I’ll] see if my guy can make that play,’ ” Ragone said. “You don’t want to try that in the game the first time. You want to see it in practice.”

Taking charge of the team

After completing a long throw to Robinson on Monday, Trubisky saw rookie linebacker Kylie Fitts in discomfort on the ground after his rush failed and checked on him before moving on to the next play.

“There’s a huge difference from training camp a year ago to now,” Ragone said. “He was the third-string quarterback [then], and it wasn’t his team yet. Here it’s unequivocal. It’s obviously his football team.”

Ragone called this camp “a whole different animal.”

“He’s taken leadership in terms of understanding [that] the guys around him go by his example, and it means something to him,” Ragone said. “He’s way different.”

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

Corn Cob
Corn Cob's picture
POST COUNT: 7505
Re: Biscuit
0

The Shadow wrote:

Five signs of progress: Why Bears believe QB Mitch Trubisky is on right path

ByAdam L. Jahns
 

BOURBONNAIS — As the seconds ticked off the play clock — 7, 6, 5, 4 — quarterback Mitch Trubisky continued to shout new orders to his offense. With one second left, center Cody Whitehair snapped the ball. Trubisky then threw a perfect pass to rookie receiver Anthony Miller, who was streaking down the middle of the field.

It was a big gain in a full team drill — a potential touchdown in a real game — during Trubisky’s best day so far in Bears training camp Monday.

“I would just say it’s clicking,” Trubisky said. “I am feeling that anticipation. The offense is starting to slow down.”

Here are five signs of Trubisky’s progress under new head coach Matt Nagy, as seen through the eyes of quarterbacks coach Dave Ragone, the only holdover on offense from former coach John Fox’s staff:

Learning the language

There’s an old clip from Raiders coach Jon Gruden’s days with the Buccaneers in which Gruden is on quarterback Chris Simms’ case for his inability to recite plays during practice.

“I’m making you nervous, aren’t I?” Gruden says.

“I just couldn’t spit it out,” Simms responds.

Trubisky isn’t having that problem. And Nagy’s play calls, like those in Gruden’s offense, can be complex and long — as much as 16 words.

“There’s some plays that now, when [Trubisky] hears the formation or right when the protection comes out — the first word of the play — he knows it,” Ragone said. “He doesn’t have to hear it again.”

Ragone said Trubisky is starting to display conviction and command. Better yet, he’s able to explain during their reviews why certain plays worked or others didn’t.

“He’s giving back the right answers,” Ragone said. “He’s executing plays that are not just the 101 level, but the next level. Obviously, not everything is down, but he’s making those steady improvements.”

Moving on from mistakes

Trubisky played well Sunday and Monday but also had moments of frustration. On Monday, after slipping on a run, he punted the ball. A day earlier, he rolled the ball toward the sideline after a run play was stuffed.

But it’s what Trubisky did next after those plays that resonated with Ragone. In both instances, he responded with pinpoint throws to Miller down the field.

“The big thing for him when we talk about this is live in the present,” Ragone said. “There’s nothing you can do about that last play. It might not even be your fault. That doesn’t matter.”

That’s partly why Trubisky’s interceptions earlier in camp were never viewed as a major problem. He not only was under orders from Nagy to test the waters, but his coaches wanted to see how he responded to mistakes.

“The more he gets in those adverse situations, you want to see how quickly he responds,” Ragone said. “He’s done that the last couple of days.”

Fixing fundamentals

Trubisky’s mechanics tended to go awry in games last season, when it also didn’t help that he lacked weapons and that Fox’s offensive approach was simplistic. Nagy, a former quarterback and QBs coach, has put a greater emphasis on fundamentals, and Ragone thinks Nagy’s style of offense and Trubisky’s understanding of it will help. The coaching staff is tailoring everything to Trubisky’s strengths.

“In my opinion, your fundamentals tie in to understanding the rhythm of each play,” Ragone said. “So if you understand the rhythm of your drop, when you need to get to the top of your drop, when you need to hitch and when you need to move on, your fundamentals usually fall in place.

“When you’re too fast or too slow, you typically throw your fundamentals off. That’s because you don’t have a really great understanding of the rhythm of each play, and he’s starting to get that.”

Feeling out his receivers

In recent practices, Trubisky has targeted receivers Bennie Fowler and Javon Wims as much as Miller, Allen Robinson and Kevin White. Nagy continues to rotate in different receivers, trying to see who runs which routes well — which can change depending on formations and field position.

“Coach Nagy has done a great job of explaining to Mitchell the importance of understanding the timing of each player and working with them,” Ragone said.

Ragone said he can feel the timing coming together, especially with Miller and Robinson.

“There are some throws you’re like, when he let it go, ‘Oooh,’ ” Ragone said, wincing. “But he understood that’s his guy, and his guy has made plays for him.”

It goes back to testing the waters.

“You want to see what you can get away with in terms of ‘Maybe I can fit that ball in there’ or ‘[I’ll] see if my guy can make that play,’ ” Ragone said. “You don’t want to try that in the game the first time. You want to see it in practice.”

Taking charge of the team

After completing a long throw to Robinson on Monday, Trubisky saw rookie linebacker Kylie Fitts in discomfort on the ground after his rush failed and checked on him before moving on to the next play.

“There’s a huge difference from training camp a year ago to now,” Ragone said. “He was the third-string quarterback [then], and it wasn’t his team yet. Here it’s unequivocal. It’s obviously his football team.”

Ragone called this camp “a whole different animal.”

“He’s taken leadership in terms of understanding [that] the guys around him go by his example, and it means something to him,” Ragone said. “He’s way different.”

 

As Shadow said in a different thread, I'm quite curious to see Biscuit go against an other teams defense Thursday night.....how many strides has he taken to improvement so far?

 

 

The Shadow
The Shadow's picture
POST COUNT: 9309
Re: Biscuit
0

Corn Cob wrote:

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY The Shadow

Five signs of progress: Why Bears believe QB Mitch Trubisky is on right path

ByAdam L. Jahns
 

BOURBONNAIS — As the seconds ticked off the play clock — 7, 6, 5, 4 — quarterback Mitch Trubisky continued to shout new orders to his offense. With one second left, center Cody Whitehair snapped the ball. Trubisky then threw a perfect pass to rookie receiver Anthony Miller, who was streaking down the middle of the field.

It was a big gain in a full team drill — a potential touchdown in a real game — during Trubisky’s best day so far in Bears training camp Monday.

“I would just say it’s clicking,” Trubisky said. “I am feeling that anticipation. The offense is starting to slow down.”

Here are five signs of Trubisky’s progress under new head coach Matt Nagy, as seen through the eyes of quarterbacks coach Dave Ragone, the only holdover on offense from former coach John Fox’s staff:

Learning the language

There’s an old clip from Raiders coach Jon Gruden’s days with the Buccaneers in which Gruden is on quarterback Chris Simms’ case for his inability to recite plays during practice.

“I’m making you nervous, aren’t I?” Gruden says.

“I just couldn’t spit it out,” Simms responds.

Trubisky isn’t having that problem. And Nagy’s play calls, like those in Gruden’s offense, can be complex and long — as much as 16 words.

“There’s some plays that now, when [Trubisky] hears the formation or right when the protection comes out — the first word of the play — he knows it,” Ragone said. “He doesn’t have to hear it again.”

Ragone said Trubisky is starting to display conviction and command. Better yet, he’s able to explain during their reviews why certain plays worked or others didn’t.

“He’s giving back the right answers,” Ragone said. “He’s executing plays that are not just the 101 level, but the next level. Obviously, not everything is down, but he’s making those steady improvements.”

Moving on from mistakes

Trubisky played well Sunday and Monday but also had moments of frustration. On Monday, after slipping on a run, he punted the ball. A day earlier, he rolled the ball toward the sideline after a run play was stuffed.

But it’s what Trubisky did next after those plays that resonated with Ragone. In both instances, he responded with pinpoint throws to Miller down the field.

“The big thing for him when we talk about this is live in the present,” Ragone said. “There’s nothing you can do about that last play. It might not even be your fault. That doesn’t matter.”

That’s partly why Trubisky’s interceptions earlier in camp were never viewed as a major problem. He not only was under orders from Nagy to test the waters, but his coaches wanted to see how he responded to mistakes.

“The more he gets in those adverse situations, you want to see how quickly he responds,” Ragone said. “He’s done that the last couple of days.”

Fixing fundamentals

Trubisky’s mechanics tended to go awry in games last season, when it also didn’t help that he lacked weapons and that Fox’s offensive approach was simplistic. Nagy, a former quarterback and QBs coach, has put a greater emphasis on fundamentals, and Ragone thinks Nagy’s style of offense and Trubisky’s understanding of it will help. The coaching staff is tailoring everything to Trubisky’s strengths.

“In my opinion, your fundamentals tie in to understanding the rhythm of each play,” Ragone said. “So if you understand the rhythm of your drop, when you need to get to the top of your drop, when you need to hitch and when you need to move on, your fundamentals usually fall in place.

“When you’re too fast or too slow, you typically throw your fundamentals off. That’s because you don’t have a really great understanding of the rhythm of each play, and he’s starting to get that.”

Feeling out his receivers

In recent practices, Trubisky has targeted receivers Bennie Fowler and Javon Wims as much as Miller, Allen Robinson and Kevin White. Nagy continues to rotate in different receivers, trying to see who runs which routes well — which can change depending on formations and field position.

“Coach Nagy has done a great job of explaining to Mitchell the importance of understanding the timing of each player and working with them,” Ragone said.

Ragone said he can feel the timing coming together, especially with Miller and Robinson.

“There are some throws you’re like, when he let it go, ‘Oooh,’ ” Ragone said, wincing. “But he understood that’s his guy, and his guy has made plays for him.”

It goes back to testing the waters.

“You want to see what you can get away with in terms of ‘Maybe I can fit that ball in there’ or ‘[I’ll] see if my guy can make that play,’ ” Ragone said. “You don’t want to try that in the game the first time. You want to see it in practice.”

Taking charge of the team

After completing a long throw to Robinson on Monday, Trubisky saw rookie linebacker Kylie Fitts in discomfort on the ground after his rush failed and checked on him before moving on to the next play.

“There’s a huge difference from training camp a year ago to now,” Ragone said. “He was the third-string quarterback [then], and it wasn’t his team yet. Here it’s unequivocal. It’s obviously his football team.”

Ragone called this camp “a whole different animal.”

“He’s taken leadership in terms of understanding [that] the guys around him go by his example, and it means something to him,” Ragone said. “He’s way different.”

I haven't been here every practice but by the sounds of it, This is one of Trubisky's best practices of the year. He's been on point. The chemistry continues to build with his new weapons... specifically Robinson and Miller so far today. #BearsCamp

— Christian Shanafelt (@ChrisShanafelt) August 6, 2018

 

As Shadow said in a different thread, I'm quite curious to see Biscuit go against an other teams defense Thursday night.....how many strides has he taken to improvement so far?

 

 

That will be proof in the pudding! Stop talking, Start doing!

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

The Shadow
The Shadow's picture
POST COUNT: 9309
Re: Biscuit
0

Why Mitch Trubisky wasn't willing to write off the Bears' sloppiness in Cincinnati

By JJ STANKEVITZ August 09, 2018 10:53 PM

CINCINNATI — The results in his preseason debut weren’t much different for Mitch Trubisky than what was customary in 2017: Two ineffective runs, then a short completion or an incompletion on third down, then a punt. 

Trubisky quarterbacked the Bears’ first two drives in their 30-27 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals Thursday evening at Paul Brown Stadium, completing two of four passes for four yards and a passer rating of 56.2. But while the results were shades of his dour rookie year, they weren’t what Trubisky felt like he and the offense had been building toward over the last few days of practice. 

And that’s one reason why Trubisky wasn’t willing to write off the sloppiness of the first-team offense as this group shaking off some rust. 

“Our standards are higher that we expect to be better,” Trubisky said. “No excuse for first preseason game. We have a bunch of experienced guys from last year, so there shouldn’t be any jitters. Maybe guys were excited, but it’s very simple — come out here, do your job, do exactly what we were doing in practice. We practiced our butts off this week. We just came out here and were sloppy.”

Trubisky added that he thought it was “surprising” the offense was so sloppy. A few examples of what he was talking about: He and Kevin White couldn’t connect on a deep shot on the first play of the game, White dropped a pass, Eric Kush was beaten back by Geno Atkins for a sack and Cody Whitehair was whistled for holding. Those accounted for four of the 10 snaps Trubisky took (only eight were official — there was a roughing the passer penalty that bailed out White’s drop, and then Whitehair’s penalty). 

“You definitely want to see a better start out of this offense," Trubisky said. "That was definitely not the way we’d been practicing, and that’s not what this offense is going to be this year."

It was somewhat telling that Trubisky was frustrated with how things went on Thursday. A few thoughts on it: First, he doesn’t have the gravitas of an experienced veteran to say “oh, well, it’s the first preseason game.” Second: Well, it was sloppy, and that kind of play isn’t up to the standard Trubisky set for himself and the Bears’ offense this year. 

“It’s going to be changed, because that’s not who we are or who we want to be,” Trubisky said. 

From a bigger-picture standpoint, though, this still was only Trubisky’s first preseason game of 2018. The Bears haven’t begun gameplanning for opponents yet as Nagy and offensive coordinator Mark Helfrich have focused on installing plays on a daily basis. Nagy said he thought Trubisky’s operation of the offense was smooth, and came away with neither a negative nor positive grade on his starting quarterback. 

“This is so early right now, it really is,” Nagy said. “… It will be fun as we go here to get them some more snaps, let them get into a rhythm and, really, for all the guys to get into a rhythm offensively. He’s going to have eight snaps to take a look at and see what was right and what was wrong, but it’s hard to judge off of eight plays.”

It’s worth noting, too, that the following players did not participate in Thursday’s game: Jordan Howard, Benny Cunningham, Allen Robinson, Taylor Gabriel and Dion Sims. Tarik Cohen nominally started, but didn’t touch the ball. So while Trubisky was working with his starting “U” tight end (Trey Burton), a presumptive starting wideout (Anthony Miller) and his entire starting offensive line (for the first series, until Kyle Long came out for the second one), there were plenty of pieces missing that are expected to be ready for Week 1. 

From an even bigger picture view, Thursday’s game being sloppy shouldn’t be too surprising, given the installation process of learning had generated some sloppy practices in Bourbonnais to this point even if they hadn't come in the last few days. There’s still a month until the Bears’ season-opening trip to Green Bay, and nobody around these parts is close to worrying about how Trubisky and his teammates are growing into the offense. 

But to Trubisky’s credit, he was frustrated. He was disappointed. And that’s probably how the Bears want the face of the franchise to feel after not performing to the level he believes he can reach — even if it was “only” a preseason game. 

“You get limited to so many plays, so you go out there and try to do the best you can with it,” Trubisky said. “It’s gotta be better. It will be better.”

*****

You tell em Mitch! I am really liking this kid. He speaks thruths.

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

PapaBear.OR
PapaBear.OR's picture
POST COUNT: 11971
Re: Biscuit
0

The Shadow wrote:

Why Mitch Trubisky wasn't willing to write off the Bears' sloppiness in Cincinnati

By JJ STANKEVITZ August 09, 2018 10:53 PM

CINCINNATI — The results in his preseason debut weren’t much different for Mitch Trubisky than what was customary in 2017: Two ineffective runs, then a short completion or an incompletion on third down, then a punt. 

Trubisky quarterbacked the Bears’ first two drives in their 30-27 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals Thursday evening at Paul Brown Stadium, completing two of four passes for four yards and a passer rating of 56.2. But while the results were shades of his dour rookie year, they weren’t what Trubisky felt like he and the offense had been building toward over the last few days of practice. 

*****

You tell em Mitch! I am really liking this kid. He speaks thruths.

If didn't know better I would say he sounds angry......

 

Butkus never wore an earring

Calbrooks
Calbrooks's picture
POST COUNT: 8182
Re: Biscuit
0

*****

The Bears kicked off their joint practices with the Broncos Wednesday and all-world pass-rusher Von Miller’s offered his opinion of what kind of player Trubisky is. “He’s a franchise quarterback,” Miller said. “He can do a little bit of everything so you have to be prepared for everything.”

Miller knows a thing or two about quarterbacks. His 83.5 sacks since 2011 are proof of that. So when he likes what he sees in Trubisky, it matters.

*****

https://bearswire.usatoday.com/2018/08/15/von-miller-praises-mitch-trubisky-calls-him-a-franchise-qb/

Train like you are 2nd, but play like you are 1st.

PapaBear.OR
PapaBear.OR's picture
POST COUNT: 11971
Re: Biscuit
0

Calbrooks wrote:

*****

The Bears kicked off their joint practices with the Broncos Wednesday and all-world pass-rusher Von Miller’s offered his opinion of what kind of player Trubisky is. “He’s a franchise quarterback,” Miller said. “He can do a little bit of everything so you have to be prepared for everything.”

Miller knows a thing or two about quarterbacks. His 83.5 sacks since 2011 are proof of that. So when he likes what he sees in Trubisky, it matters.

*****

https://bearswire.usatoday.com/2018/08/15/von-miller-praises-mitch-trubisky-calls-him-a-franchise-qb/

That is a nice endorsement, and from what I read he had a good day throwing to his TEs and threw no picks yesterday.

Butkus never wore an earring

Corn Cob
Corn Cob's picture
POST COUNT: 7505
Re: Biscuit
0

PapaBear.OR wrote:

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY Calbrooks

*****

The Bears kicked off their joint practices with the Broncos Wednesday and all-world pass-rusher Von Miller’s offered his opinion of what kind of player Trubisky is. “He’s a franchise quarterback,” Miller said. “He can do a little bit of everything so you have to be prepared for everything.”

Miller knows a thing or two about quarterbacks. His 83.5 sacks since 2011 are proof of that. So when he likes what he sees in Trubisky, it matters.

*****

https://bearswire.usatoday.com/2018/08/15/von-miller-praises-mitch-trubisky-calls-him-a-franchise-qb/

That is a nice endorsement, and from what I read he had a good day throwing to his TEs and threw no picks yesterday.

*****************

Love me some TE action....long time coming!

PapaBear.OR
PapaBear.OR's picture
POST COUNT: 11971
Re: Biscuit
0

Bears’ starting QB Mitchell Trubisky threw just one incompletion through his first two series during team period when Broncos’ S Will Parks nearly intercepted a pass in the red zone.

https://www.denverpost.com/2018/08/16/broncos-training-camp-2018-practice-16/

Butkus never wore an earring

HIREPLY
MEMBERS ONLINE: 0