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Calbrooks
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*****

Tyler Dunn of Bleacher Report got a chance to sit down with the young quarterback recently for an interview. As the conversation covered a wide range of topics, the subject of leadership soon came up. This is one that Trubisky takes more serious than any other. So much in fact that he keeps a screenshot on his cell phone from one of his favorite books titled The Captain Class by Sam Walker.

In it, there is a list of character traits or rules that a good leader must operate by to have success and to get others to follow him.

“Read that,” Trubisky says, “and tell me you wouldn’t want your captain to be all those things.”

1. Extreme doggedness and focus in competition.

2. Aggressive play that tests the limits of the rules.

3. A willingness to do thankless jobs in the shadows.

4. A low-key, practical, and democratic communication style.

5. Motivates others with passionate nonverbal displays.

6. Strong convictions and the courage to stand apart.

7. Ironclad emotional control.

Adds Trubisky, “Not once does it say, ‘I want this guy to cuss his teammates out’ or give a big halftime speech.”

*****

http://sportsmockery.com/2018/07/mitch-trubisky-has-7-rules-for-leadership-and-theyll-fire-you-up/

Can't accuse the kid for not having very clear desires and goals.

Train like you are 2nd, but play like you are 1st.

me654
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sounds a lot like Jay Cutler lol

"Jay Cutler can throw a football and cut it through the elements as well as anyone out there. Arm talent immense, the upside you love it. The reason I'm critical is I wish I had it"-Trent Dilfer

The Shadow
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me654 wrote:

sounds a lot like Jay Cutler lol

You are right there, ME!

I mean Number 5. especially, non-verbal? Nothing fired up the Bears more than Jay's shoulder twitch and head jerk!

And number 4! F**King J'Marcus! awww...c'mere buddy, lemme tie your shoe for you! You big Goof!

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

The Shadow
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Matt, Mark and Mitch: Odd Offensive Triumvirate Tries to Bring Back Bears

BOURBONNAIS, Ill. — “You gotta say hi to Mark,” Bears coach Matt Nagy said Sunday morning just before 7, as we finished our talk in his Olivet Nazarene University RA apartment-turned-training-camp-office-and-bedroom. (Sparse, but with a big desk, comfy barcalounger, flat-screen, XOS video system and all the Gatorade you could want—a swell camp setup.)

Mark. Nagy’s across-the-hall neighbor and offensive alter-ego, Mark Helfrich, the former Oregon head coach and one of the most interesting hires of this NFL season. Helfrich replaced Chip Kelly when Kelly bolted for the Eagles, lasted four years, did college games on TV last year, and leapt at the chance to work with a total stranger when he called late last season.

Nagy knocked on Helfrich’s door. We waited. I couldn’t help but think how downright weird this whole thing is. Weird in a football-test-tube/experimental way, with the potential of the next wave of the trendy Run Pass Option system. And also weird in how much Nagy—who might get only one chance at this dream job—trusts a man he never worked with before and just met in January. In football, coaches invariably hire their friends, or men they worked with for years. Nagy, for the biggest job on his staff, hired a man he didn’t know, who never coached in the NFL, who was on zero NFL radar screens.

There are so many interesting things about the Bears, I can’t count them all. The crucial maturation of Mitch Trubisky at the position that’s been comically inept for the Bears; it seems impossible for an NFL franchise to have had one Pro Bowl quarterback season (Jim McMahon, 1985) in the last half-century, but it’s true. “Weird,” Trubisky said … Super Bowl hero Trey Burton being the kind of weapon he’s always dreamed of being. (“I’m more than just ‘Philly Special,’ “ he told me. “I can play.”) … A garden salad of a coaching staff led by a guy who was selling real estate in rural Pennsylvania eight years agoPraying that Leonard Floyd can somehow turn into the first primo long-term pass-rusher for the franchise since Richard DentWideout Kevin White, hurt for all three seasons since being a top-10 pick in 2015, trying to save his career in this camp … The anticipation of getting holdout first-round linebacker Roquan Smith in camp, so he can grow into the nerve center of a highly questionable defense. And more.

My favorite story is the odd triumverate of Nagy, Helfrich and Trubisky. Eighteen months ago, they were in Kansas City, Eugene and Chapel Hill, respectively. Now they’re in a race to merge brains and erase the stench of the recent Bears (19-45 in the last four years). In the first three practices of camp, with near-constant stalled cool rainstorms overhead, the new Bears took shape. For their sake, they’d better be new.

“It’s time,” said a fan, Todd Harris of Watseca, Ill., who was the first in line outside the camp gate Saturday morning, at 2:30 a.m. “Somebody’s got to light a fire under these guys’ butts. I’m hoping it’s Matt Nagy.”

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

The Shadow
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Get Familiar With RPOs, Chicago Fans

Back to that knock on the door.

Helfrich, 44, opened it. A salt-and-pepper stubble covered his face, and he seemed much happier coaching football than he did talking about it (for FOX, in 2017). “I’ve told people the one pretty big difference is the players’ parking lot has nicer cars in it here,” the former Oregon coach said. “Otherwise, it’s coaching.”

A longtime friend on the Chiefs’ staff last year strongly advised Nagy to reach out to Helfrich, who badly wanted to get back into coaching. When Nagy first called Helfrich during the Chiefs’ season to check in, he didn’t have much time—Helfrich and wife were on a short vacation in central Oregon, and cell service was spotty. Nagy, Andy Reid’s offensive coordinator in Kansas City, wanted an imaginative alter-ego to team with on offense if he got a shot at a head-coaching job. “Andy always told us, ‘Hire people better than you are,’” Nagy said. “That appealed to me. I asked Mark after about 15 minutes of talk, you know, hey, if I get a job, do you think you’d have any interest at all? And after maybe 30 seconds of thinking about it, he said, ‘It’s crazy you called. There is interest.’ So once I heard that, now we can really start talking. So we did. I started talking to him about how it would go. I asked if he would be okay if I called the plays, and he was.”

Nagy, and many around football, have admired the Oregon offense for years, during both the Chip Kelly and Helfrich periods. It’s a more run-oriented scheme than people think, and using ways to hide tendencies and have the passing game flow though the running game. “And then obviously he’s so smart when it comes to the RPOs,” Nagy said.

As the 2018 camp season dawns, expect to hear those initials more and more and more. You saw the plays last year—the quarterback putting the ball in the back’s gut and “riding” the back for a step or two while deciding whether to yank it back and throw, or give the back the ball. Last year, the Eagles with Carson Wentz and Nick Foles used run-pass-option schemes to throw changeups at teams, and it became fashionable for teams to dabble in it. Some teams worry about the risk of injury to the quarterback, which is valid. But the reward makes it a worthy consideration.

Trubisky clearly wants to do it; he dabbled with it at North Carolina, then did none of it last year in Chicago’s old offense. “I think just hiding the ball with the running back and then quick throws down the field—those are skills that fit what I can do well and I really enjoy the RPO as well. I think it keeps it simple. It allows us to play fast and it’s hard for the defense to cover.”

As a very heavy mist fell over the practice fields Sunday morning, the new thing got unveiled. In the shotgun, Trubisky took a snap from center, put the ball in scatback Tarik Cohen’s gut, stayed with him for two steps, withdrew the ball when he saw he’d have time to throw, and fired a completion for mybe 15 yards to tight end Colin Thompson.

“I think that’s the direction our offense is taking,” said Cohen. “I really like it.”

The Bears got that sort of versatile tight end to play in fungible schemes like the RPO in Burton. It’s wholly premature to say Trubisky can be a Wentz-type player, but he has similar quickness and arm ability. Can he play as fast as Wentz? Can he throw as well downfield, even with the speed of the RPOs?

“People have asked me about that comparison,” Burton said, “and they’ve taken it in the wrong way. I would never say Mitch is Wentz—Carson’s a top two or three quarterback in the league, and Mitch is still getting there. The athleticism, the quick thinking, the deep-ball ability, putting things in tight holes.”

One other interesting thing I found at practice Sunday. Nagy will call the plays during the season, but he was allowing Helfrich to use the coach-to-helmet system to make the playcalls at practice; Nagy watched and coached other people. Because the system is new, Trubisky has worked the off-season to be sure he knows the more complicated offense with more verbiage per play. But Nagy doesn’t just want Trubisky to memorize the calls and repeat them in the huddle. He wants Trubisky to enunciate each part of the play-call while looking at the player or players who are that exact part of the play. This might be too inside-football … but Trubisky, when calling the assignment for the “Z” receiver, for instance, will probably have a word beginning with Z or simply the letter Z; Nagy wants Trubisky to look at that man when calling it. Nagy wants his quarterback to see if his offensive mates process the call, basically.

To learn all those plays, Trubisky spent the offseason drilling himself with flash cards, so he could accelerate his knowledge. Some of the plays are 15 words long or longer. So I wanted to do a test Sunday, to see how Helfrich and Trubisky were doing. As the 40-second play clock ticked down, and Helfrich called the plays into Trubisky’s helmet, and Trubisky announced the play in the huddle, and as the offense went to the line, I wanted to see how long it would take this process to happen. Would the offense be risking delay-of-game calls? On seven plays over two team periods, Trubisky had at least 16 seconds left when he got to the line and began surveying the defense. Well done.

“He can speak the language,” said Nagy. “But now he’s got to play the language.”

Trubisky announced Friday he was quitting social media for the season. He even got social junkie Kyle Long to go cold turkey too. “I’ll see you,” Long said to me when I was leaving camp Sunday. “But I won’t see you on Twitter.”

That’s probably smart, particularly for the quarterback. Trubisky doesn’t seem to be bothered by the pressure that comes with his position—and with the pressure for the Bears finally to have picked the right quarterback. “It’s really weird,” he said. “People ask me about pressure all the time. Everything else on the outside, the pressure, when everyone talks about it, I’m really numb to it now. I don’t even feel the pressure the way people expect. I’ve done a really good job of just blocking it out and focusing on what I gotta do. There’s no pressure if you’re just playing the game and having fun.”

There’s a lot to like about the Bears—the thirst for new ideas, the head coach challenging himself to learn more with a coach he’s just getting know, the quarterback saying all the right things and looking good (which Trubisky did Sunday) in lousy weather. But don’t forget: Chicago hasn’t won more than eight games in a season since 2012. And there are two veteran teams in the division (Green Bay, Minnesota) with better quarterbacks ahead of them. There’s another team, Detroit, with a better quarterback that’s right in their league. Can Trubisky get to Matthew Stafford’s level? In time perhaps. But with all the newness, this team looks like a better bet to challenge for the division in 2019, not ’18.

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

The Shadow
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Mitchell Trubisky seeking to find consistency

Posted by Charean Williams on July 22, 2018, 10:35 PM EDT

Mitchell Trubisky hopes to make critics “eat their words” this season, but he’s got a long way to go to accomplish that.

The Bears quarterback has been up and down in the three training camp practices so far, including the first padded practice Sunday.

Rich Campbell of the Chicago Tribune called Trubisky’s performance “inconsistent.”

It is not unexpected.

Even though Trubisky played more football than either of the other 2017 first-round quarterbacks — Deshaun Watson and Patrick Mahomes — it amounted to only 724 snaps in 12 starts. Trubisky threw seven touchdowns and seven interceptions as a rookie.

He now is learning a new offense with a new head coach and a new offensive coordinator.

“For our offense, this thing is not going to happen overnight,” coach Matt Nagy said, via Campbell. “They understand that. We as coaches understand that. It’s going to take time. We’re building it. You have to temper that a little bit. You can’t expect to come out and it just take off right away. That is a part of this process. But as long as you stay patient with it and don’t get frustrated, you’ll be all right.”

*****

Is Nagy already hedging his bets on the upcoming season? So does this mean we are in year 6 of a 3 year re-build? This is why I think the Bears will be 7-9 at best this year.

I think Mitch just may be the next Jay Cutler....although in a more likeable package. He is going to make some plays where you go "Wow!" then he will make a few mistakes to bring you back to Earth.

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

PapaBear.OR
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Mitchell Trubisky Reflects On His Rookie Season and His Lessons Learned

When I wasn’t playing for the first four weeks of the season, I learned a lot about preparation and management of the game.

Mark Sanchez taught me a lot about situational football and Mike Glennon taught me about preparation and what days to watch what film.

Waiting three seasons to start at North Carolina prepared me for starting my rookie year on the sidelines.

I felt very comfortable in warmups for my first start.

My first interception taught me I need to know when to throw the ball away and live to play another down

When you get the right look from a defense you have to take advantage of it.

Mark Sanchez taught me a lot about situational football and Mike Glennon taught me about preparation and what days to watch what film.

Waiting three seasons to start at North Carolina prepared me for starting my rookie year on the sidelines.

My first interception taught me I need to know when to throw the ball away and live to play another down.

When you get the right look from a defense you have to take advantage of it. Playing the Panthers in Week 7, I connected with Tarik Cohen for 70 yards because we got the look we wanted for the play. We put that play in just for the Panthers that week. We had a through route that ate up the safety and Tarik ran a great route, a double move on the outside. It was pretty windy that day so coach was worried about calling it, but I really wanted to throw the ball down the field. Tarik got wide open, I just put the ball where it needed to be and the O-line did a good job up front. I made that throw a bunch of times in practice and it’s only a matter of time and execution before it is shown on the field. Sometimes you hit it in practice over and over again, and something different happens in the game, but that’s why you put the work in so the things you do in practice can happen on game day and come to life on the field.

People remember that Panthers game because I only threw seven passes and we won with two defensive touchdowns. But I wouldn’t let any one game represent who I am. That game definitely doesn’t represent me because I am a gunslinger, I want to throw the ball around 30, 40, 50 times a game. Us not throwing it, and the playcalls, that is out of my control. I just handled it as best as I could. At the end of the day, for us, a win is a win. It was a sour taste in our mouth on offense, because we felt like we didn’t do our job to help our defense enough, but they played so well that we were still able to come out with a win. You want to win and the goal is to win and you gotta do whatever you gotta do for your team, and the defense just carried us that game, but obviously as an offense you want to help out your defense a lot more.

I think my athletic abilities sometimes get slept on, but it’s something that I have always gone back to and need to continue to use to keep the defense on their heels.

Seeing a bunch of defenses last year and having film I can watch from last season is definitely going to help me in year two.

With Matt Nagy, there is a totally different vibe around the building and there’s a feeling that we are headed in the right direction. You can just feel the excitement at practice. We’ve realized that we aren’t the team we were last year. The past is the past,....

I think we have the right pieces on offense to have a successful year.

https://www.si.com/nfl/2018/07/20/mitchell-trubisky-chicago-bears-rookie-season

Long Sports Illustrated article but a good one I thought...... I edited most out but left the topics of conversation.

Butkus never wore an earring

The Shadow
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Anyone else notice every new Head Coach, the Bears hire, has a players slogan?

Lovie: "He treats us like grown men"

Trestman: "He is here to build better men"

Fox: "He has turned teams around everywhere he has been"

Nagy: "He brings a vibe to the building"

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

The Shadow
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Trubisky ranked 29th among NFL QBs by front office execs

By Bryan Perez July 25, 2018 8:17 AM

Mitch Trubisky has a lot to prove in 2018. He was drafted second overall in 2017 to be the Chicago Bears' franchise quarterback, and with that stature comes a whole lot of pressure.

It doesn't seem like many in the media are confident he can become that guy. Trubisky's rookie season has been described as underwhelming and set the narrative heading into 2018 that he may be nothing more than an average starter.

That narrative is made clear in a recent ESPN poll of "10 general managers, five head coaches, 10 coordinators, 10 senior personnel executives, five QB coaches and 10 others with job titles ranging from assistant coach to salary-cap manager to analytics director."

Trubisky ranked as a Tier 4 starter and the 29th-best QB in the NFL:

There was some thought among voters that Trubisky could enjoy a Goff-like revival after undergoing a coaching change and weaponry overhaul, although no one expected Chicago to start scoring the way the Rams did a year ago. One GM questioned Trubisky's accuracy. Another noted that when Trubisky was in college, he couldn't make an average team much better than average.

Trubisky made it clear at the start of training camp that he's tired of the comparisons to Jared Goff and Carson Wentz (the ones that say he could enjoy a similar second-year breakout). He's also tired of the doubters and critics who've questioned his game over the last several months.

Paired with coach Matt Nagy and an arsenal of playmaking receivers, Trubisky should silence those critics with a strong 2018.

And that's exactly what the Bears organization is expecting.

*****

You tell 'em Sheriff Mitchy!

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

PapaBear.OR
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Mitchell Trubisky has the highest selling jersey in the NFC North

According to the latest jersey report from Dick’s Sporting Goods, Chicago Bears’ quarterback Mitchell Trubisky has the highest selling jersey among all four teams in the NFC North. He not only bests all other jerseys from the Minnesota Vikings, Detroit Lions, and the Green Bay Packers, but there are only four other players that have more sold than Trubisky’s #10.

Here’s how the overall top 5 looks.

Carson Wentz, Philadelphia Eagles
Saquon Barkley, New York Giants
Tom Brady, New England Patriots
Dak Prescott, Dallas Cowboys
Mitchell Trubisky, Chicago Bears

https://www.windycitygridiron.com/2018/7/25/17613402/chicago-bears-mitchell-trubisky-has-highest-selling-jersey-in-the-nfc-north-packers-vikings-lions

 

Butkus never wore an earring

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