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Calbrooks
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Re: Biscuit
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Seems realistic to me....

Train like you are 2nd, but play like you are 1st.

PapaBear.OR
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The Keys to Trubisky’s Potential
By Andy Benoit
June 06, 2018

The Bears are amidst their first post-draft minicamp under new head coach Matt Nagy, and the 40-year-old former Chiefs offensive coordinator would not be here unless management believed his system was the best fit for quarterback Mitchell Trubisky. How that marriage goes will determine where both men are four years from now.

To understand it, we must understand Trubisky—both what he can be and what he is currently. For what he can be: Trubisky has a strong enough arm, but he’s not Brett Favre. He’s a good athlete, but he’s not Michael Vick. His greatest attribute is his ability to throw on the move, both by design (rollouts, bootlegs) and improvisation. Like many mobile righthanded QBs, he’s particularly proficient outside the pocket to his right.

But in the NFL, on-the-move passing can only be an offense’s side dish, not the entrée. And so Trubisky’s success, like every pro QB’s, will come down to how well he plays within the pocket. Given his good-not-great arm strength, this means how well he can develop as a timing and rhythm passer. Think of Trubisky as a potentially better version of Kirk Cousins.

This is what Trubisky can be. But Nagy must work with what Trubisky is now. Last year, Trubisky, like many rookies, was up and down. He didn’t show a strong sense of timing and rhythm until December (encouragingly, by the end of the season that included anticipation passing, the highest level of timing and rhythm throwing). But Trubisky that month also still showed the lack of refinement that marred him in October and November. He’d hold the ball too long, or more often leave the pocket too early. That’s normal for a young QB, but it’s also normal for a quality QB to rectify early in his career. Trubisky must continue to improve here.

The hope is Nagy’s scheme will help. It’s a stronger scheme when the QB plays on a crisp schedule, but it’s not overly reliant on that. Nagy’s QB in Kansas City, Alex Smith, read the field with aplomb but was not an exact timing and rhythm player. Smith had to see targets get open, and he rarely threw with anticipation. This meant his reads had to be clearly defined.

While Trubisky’s developing mental acumen will be the driving factor in Chicago’s passing game, the X-factor will be his mechanics. They were too erratic in 2017. The question is: How much of that stemmed from being an uncomfortable rookie and having a poor supporting cast? The hope is “a lot,” because in the NFL it’s hard to rework a QB’s mechanics, especially when he’s learning a new system. Fortunately, much of Trubisky’s issues stemmed from footwork, which is more correctable than upper-body glitches. Having watched Trubisky in OTAs, Nagy probably already knows where his QB is fundamentally. We won’t know until September, when we see it for ourselves in meaningful games, and perhaps more importantly, when we see how aggressive Nagy is calling plays.

https://www.si.com/nfl/2018/06/06/mitchell-trubisky-chicago-bears-matt-nagy

Butkus never wore an earring

The Shadow
The Shadow's picture
POST COUNT: 9309
Re: Biscuit
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PapaBear.OR wrote:

The Keys to Trubisky’s Potential
By Andy Benoit
June 06, 2018

The Bears are amidst their first post-draft minicamp under new head coach Matt Nagy, and the 40-year-old former Chiefs offensive coordinator would not be here unless management believed his system was the best fit for quarterback Mitchell Trubisky. How that marriage goes will determine where both men are four years from now.

To understand it, we must understand Trubisky—both what he can be and what he is currently. For what he can be: Trubisky has a strong enough arm, but he’s not Brett Favre. He’s a good athlete, but he’s not Michael Vick. His greatest attribute is his ability to throw on the move, both by design (rollouts, bootlegs) and improvisation. Like many mobile righthanded QBs, he’s particularly proficient outside the pocket to his right.

But in the NFL, on-the-move passing can only be an offense’s side dish, not the entrée. And so Trubisky’s success, like every pro QB’s, will come down to how well he plays within the pocket. Given his good-not-great arm strength, this means how well he can develop as a timing and rhythm passer. Think of Trubisky as a potentially better version of Kirk Cousins.

This is what Trubisky can be. But Nagy must work with what Trubisky is now. Last year, Trubisky, like many rookies, was up and down. He didn’t show a strong sense of timing and rhythm until December (encouragingly, by the end of the season that included anticipation passing, the highest level of timing and rhythm throwing). But Trubisky that month also still showed the lack of refinement that marred him in October and November. He’d hold the ball too long, or more often leave the pocket too early. That’s normal for a young QB, but it’s also normal for a quality QB to rectify early in his career. Trubisky must continue to improve here.

The hope is Nagy’s scheme will help. It’s a stronger scheme when the QB plays on a crisp schedule, but it’s not overly reliant on that. Nagy’s QB in Kansas City, Alex Smith, read the field with aplomb but was not an exact timing and rhythm player. Smith had to see targets get open, and he rarely threw with anticipation. This meant his reads had to be clearly defined.

While Trubisky’s developing mental acumen will be the driving factor in Chicago’s passing game, the X-factor will be his mechanics. They were too erratic in 2017. The question is: How much of that stemmed from being an uncomfortable rookie and having a poor supporting cast? The hope is “a lot,” because in the NFL it’s hard to rework a QB’s mechanics, especially when he’s learning a new system. Fortunately, much of Trubisky’s issues stemmed from footwork, which is more correctable than upper-body glitches. Having watched Trubisky in OTAs, Nagy probably already knows where his QB is fundamentally. We won’t know until September, when we see it for ourselves in meaningful games, and perhaps more importantly, when we see how aggressive Nagy is calling plays.

https://www.si.com/nfl/2018/06/06/mitchell-trubisky-chicago-bears-matt-nagy

This is why I do not like drafting one year players in the top 3 rounds. They have very limited actual playing experience and have limited tape to review. it will be a bit late in the game to decide Mitch has irrepairable mechanics. We have a lot of "hoping" going on this year.

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

PapaBear.OR
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POST COUNT: 11971
Re: Biscuit
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The Shadow wrote:

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY PapaBear.OR

 

While Trubisky’s developing mental acumen will be the driving factor in Chicago’s passing game, the X-factor will be his mechanics. They were too erratic in 2017. The question is: How much of that stemmed from being an uncomfortable rookie and having a poor supporting cast? The hope is “a lot,” because in the NFL it’s hard to rework a QB’s mechanics, especially when he’s learning a new system. Fortunately, much of Trubisky’s issues stemmed from footwork, which is more correctable than upper-body glitches. Having watched Trubisky in OTAs, Nagy probably already knows where his QB is fundamentally. We won’t know until September, when we see it for ourselves in meaningful games, and perhaps more importantly, when we see how aggressive Nagy is calling plays.

https://www.si.com/nfl/2018/06/06/mitchell-trubisky-chicago-bears-matt-nagy

This is why I do not like drafting one year players in the top 3 rounds. They have very limited actual playing experience and have limited tape to review. it will be a bit late in the game to decide Mitch has irrepairable mechanics. We have a lot of "hoping" going on this year.

What the author fails to mention is that "MUCH MORE" of that stemmed from Loggains forcing a young first year QB into predictable and very awkward situations....... Loggains did nothing to help the kid. 

Butkus never wore an earring

PapaBear.OR
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POST COUNT: 11971
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Mitch Trubisky explains his drive as a quarterback

The road to being the second overall pick and the starting quarterback of the Chicago Bears was not exactly easy for Mitch Trubisky. The Mentor, Ohio native threw for over 9,000 yards with 92 touchdowns and ran for over 1,500 yards with 33 touchdowns and won Ohio's Mr. Football Award in 2012. 247Sports listed him as a four-star recruit and he received offers from powerhouse schools like Alabama, Ohio State, Tennessee and Michigan State before landing at North Carolina, enrolling in January 2013. After redshirting as a freshman in 2013, Trubisky served as the backup to starter Marquise Williams in 2014. The following year he once again served as the backup quarterback and started to question how he was going to go about his playing career.

He recently spoke at the All Star Preps Best of Rock River Valley Banquet in Peoria, Illinois and discussed how he understood he needed to improve his attitude in order to get to where he wanted to be playing football.

"There was a time I was questioning if this was meant to be, if this is what I'm meant to do," Trubisky said, via a video from the Journal Star. "'Why aren't I getting the opportunities I think I should be getting?' There's a switch that went off for me. I could have a bad attitude with this and just deal with it or I can find ways to get better. Continue to make my teammates better. There were hours I was doing multiple workouts a day, taking no off days, in order to improve my craft because I felt I had to work just that much harder to get my next opportunity. You can either be negative about it and take the situation that has been given to you, or just work that much harder [and] be a positive influence."

As a reserve in 2014 he completed 42 of his 78 passing attempts for 459 yards with five touchdowns and four interceptions. The following year saw him complete a staggering 85.1 percent of his 47 passing attempts for 555 yards with six touchdowns and zero interceptions. Finally in 2016, Trubisky got his opportunity to be the starter for the Tar Heels. He completed 304 of his 447 passing attempts (good enough for 68 percent) and threw for 3,748 yards with 30 touchdowns and six interceptions. He then opted to forego his final season to enter the NFL Draft.

The Bears then moved up in the draft from No. 3 to No. 2 to take Trubisky. The Bears ultimately gave up their own first rounder, the 67th overall pick (third round), the 111th overall pick (fourth round) and their 2018 third-round pick to move up for the young quarterback. Adversity struck again early in his Bears career. Despite outplaying Mike Glennon throughout much of training camp and the preseason, Trubisky began last year on the bench. Following four disappointing games for Glennon as the starter, Trubisky was inserted into the lineup in Week 5 and never looked back.

The rookie quarterback ended last season with 2,193 passing yards with seven touchdowns and seven interceptions. His numbers were not great, but he appears to firmly be in place as Chicago's starting quarterback. If it were not for his drive and positive attitude it is unlikely he would be in the position he is in today.

https://247sports.com/nfl/chicago-bears/Article/Mitch-Trubisky-explains-his-drive-as-a-quarterback-119400459/

Butkus never wore an earring

The Shadow
The Shadow's picture
POST COUNT: 9309
Re: Biscuit
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PapaBear.OR wrote:

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY The Shadow

 

ORIGINALLY POSTED BY PapaBear.OR

 

While Trubisky’s developing mental acumen will be the driving factor in Chicago’s passing game, the X-factor will be his mechanics. They were too erratic in 2017. The question is: How much of that stemmed from being an uncomfortable rookie and having a poor supporting cast? The hope is “a lot,” because in the NFL it’s hard to rework a QB’s mechanics, especially when he’s learning a new system. Fortunately, much of Trubisky’s issues stemmed from footwork, which is more correctable than upper-body glitches. Having watched Trubisky in OTAs, Nagy probably already knows where his QB is fundamentally. We won’t know until September, when we see it for ourselves in meaningful games, and perhaps more importantly, when we see how aggressive Nagy is calling plays.

https://www.si.com/nfl/2018/06/06/mitchell-trubisky-chicago-bears-matt-nagy

This is why I do not like drafting one year players in the top 3 rounds. They have very limited actual playing experience and have limited tape to review. it will be a bit late in the game to decide Mitch has irrepairable mechanics. We have a lot of "hoping" going on this year.

What the author fails to mention is that "MUCH MORE" of that stemmed from Loggains forcing a young first year QB into predictable and very awkward situations....... Loggains did nothing to help the kid. 

You can't blame everything on Loggains. Fox bears some of the blame too. He should have fired Loggains after week 2. Bears would have probably have been better off with Ragone as OC for the remainder of the year. He was the only offensive coach retained by the current HC.

Forget the fact he did nothing to help Mitch to succeed. He is also with destroying Mike Glennons career! The "Giraffe" had the skill set to become another Kyle Orton at the very least.

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

The Shadow
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Trubisky was a stud QB even in the 6th grade!

https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/1006731647499284480

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

PapaBear.OR
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POST COUNT: 11971
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The Shadow wrote:

Trubisky was a stud QB even in the 6th grade!

https://twitter.com/twitter/statuses/1006731647499284480

That is pretty suhweet

Butkus never wore an earring

PapaBear.OR
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POST COUNT: 11971
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Mitch Trubisky was the NFL's most accurate QB in the 1st quarter

...................Pro Football Focus recently noted Trubisky was the NFL's most accurate passer in the first quarter of games last season. Per PFF's Cam Mellor, Trubisky landed at No. 1 last year for the highest grade per dropback in the first quarter. He found himself ahead of Atlanta's Matt Ryan, New England's Tom Brady, Smith with the Chiefs and Cincinnati's Andy Dalton. Mellor explained it further, writing:

"Mitchell Trubisky takes the crown on this one, leading the league’s quarterbacks in PFF grade per dropback in the game’s opening stanza. He unleashed a big-time throw percentage of 7.60 percent in the first quarter, the third-highest percentage among his peers. He may have only recorded a passer rating of just 100.3, but he was incredibly accurate in the first quarter, compiling an adjusted completion percentage of 84.7, the highest in the NFL last season, by 3.0 whole points."

https://247sports.com/nfl/chicago-bears/Article/Mitch-Trubisky-was-the-NFLs-most-accurate-QB-in-the-1st-quarter-in-2017-119766203/
 

Factor in who was calling the plays last season and how a typical NFL game evolves, with the playcalling becomming more and more predictable as the games progressed and DC's adjusted to Loggains it's no surprise our Qb struggled beyond the first quarter............ more evidence that Biscuit has a ton of potential.  

Butkus never wore an earring

me654
me654's picture
POST COUNT: 1289
Re: Biscuit
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PapaBear.OR wrote:

Mitch Trubisky was the NFL's most accurate QB in the 1st quarter

...................Pro Football Focus recently noted Trubisky was the NFL's most accurate passer in the first quarter of games last season. Per PFF's Cam Mellor, Trubisky landed at No. 1 last year for the highest grade per dropback in the first quarter. He found himself ahead of Atlanta's Matt Ryan, New England's Tom Brady, Smith with the Chiefs and Cincinnati's Andy Dalton. Mellor explained it further, writing:

"Mitchell Trubisky takes the crown on this one, leading the league’s quarterbacks in PFF grade per dropback in the game’s opening stanza. He unleashed a big-time throw percentage of 7.60 percent in the first quarter, the third-highest percentage among his peers. He may have only recorded a passer rating of just 100.3, but he was incredibly accurate in the first quarter, compiling an adjusted completion percentage of 84.7, the highest in the NFL last season, by 3.0 whole points."

https://247sports.com/nfl/chicago-bears/Article/Mitch-Trubisky-was-the-NFLs-most-accurate-QB-in-the-1st-quarter-in-2017-119766203/
 

Factor in who was calling the plays last season and how a typical NFL game evolves, with the playcalling becomming more and more predictable as the games progressed and DC's adjusted to Loggains it's no surprise our Qb struggled beyond the first quarter............ more evidence that Biscuit has a ton of potential.  

and the fact he was asked to throw in high pressure situations mostly.....like 3rd and long

"Jay Cutler can throw a football and cut it through the elements as well as anyone out there. Arm talent immense, the upside you love it. The reason I'm critical is I wish I had it"-Trent Dilfer

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