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Grizzled
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Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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Bill Lazor has served as QB coach for several teams and also offensive coordinator for 2 before Nagy hired him. His tenures as OC have been marked by lack of production by his teams (Miami and Cincinnati). Admittedly neither team really had a good QB nor running game but it sounds like different versions of the Chicago Bears. I don't have much confidence that he's the missing piece to revive a moribund running game and get the scoring average per game to where it needs to be.

Sluggobear
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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How about Lazor taking over the game management, if Nagy insists on play calling. Someone needs to keep focus on the overall game, before a questionable decision or timeout causes us a game. Nagy is to busy looking at what play to call next at the risk of making poor game management decisions. Too many head coaches are doing double duty, I don't get the rationale. 

billwade
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I'm starting to believe the issues with the offense may be overblown. I was unaware that the Bears faced the 1st, 4rth and 6th ranked defenses over the last 3 games. Considering these games were the first three Nick Foles has played with the Bears, and the fact that he had no TC, OTAs preseason or first team reps unil three weeks ago, the offense may actually be ahead of schedule.

I think the thinking behind letting Lazor call the plays is twofold: First, he has a very cool name. When the Bears win, he could say things like, "I was focused like a Lazor beam," or "the offense performed like a 300 megawatt Lazor today." Second, Nagy seems overwhelmed during the game, and I think it leads to poor game management decisions. Look at the last game for example. What was with the thing about subbing Jimmy Graham out in the red zone. Then, subbing him in after the TO and subbing him out again after the penalty. Maybe if Nagy was watching the game and only focused on game management, he could offer insights at key moments and he would have the time to weigh decisions and make better ones.

It's interesting that both Lazor and Defillipo have sucked as OCs.

When you bleed, make it orange and navy blue

Calbrooks
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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Grizzled wrote:

Bill Lazor has served as QB coach for several teams and also offensive coordinator for 2 before Nagy hired him. His tenures as OC have been marked by lack of production by his teams (Miami and Cincinnati). Admittedly neither team really had a good QB nor running game but it sounds like different versions of the Chicago Bears. I don't have much confidence that he's the missing piece to revive a moribund running game and get the scoring average per game to where it needs to be.

It can get worse?!?

 

Train like you are 2nd, but play like you are 1st.

Grizzled
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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How many Bears fans wouldn't take a team which smothers other teams' offenses and scores just enough to win it all? I'd take a 17-13 or 13-10 SB win.

billwade
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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Grizzled wrote:

How many Bears fans wouldn't take a team which smothers other teams' offenses and scores just enough to win it all? I'd take a 17-13 or 13-10 SB win.

Agreed. Plus, I think the offense can and will get better. The skill players are fine, but unfortunately, they have a crappy o-line. It didn't help that the guy playing the best (or 2nd best) is now out for the season. It's tough to be good when your starting tackles would be backups on most other teams. That said, I think they will continue to work to minimize the impact of Leno and Massie. Regretably, I think that means a lot of three step drops and the ball out quickly and few deep throws that take time to develop.

When you bleed, make it orange and navy blue

Corn Cob
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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...............and also keeping the TEs around the LOS longer to help the tackles with chip blocks.

Matt Nagy: "I know we need to run the ball more. I'm not an idiot."

PapaBear.OR
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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So, How Different WAS Bill Lazor’s Play-Calling?

By the time the first drive was over on Sunday, and David Montgomery had punched in a score to give the Bears an early lead, it was clear that Bill Lazor was the one calling plays against the Lions...

Putting it simply: Matt Nagy’s game plan in the Browns game was a disaster, and it started (and pretty much ended) with his personnel decisions. The Bears ran their offense in the 11 personnel with three wide receivers for 86% of their offensive snaps...Nagy ran five-man protections for much of the game, and the Browns spent the entire afternoon in the pocket with Justin Fields. In Week 3, when Nagy used 12 personnel (one running back, two tight ends, two wide receivers), Fields was 2-for-2 on pass attempts, albeit short-yardage attempts. The run game also benefitted in the two rushing calls made with the second tight end on the line picking up 18 yards on two attempts. But, despite the success with the two tight ends helping in the blocking department, Nagy only used this personnel five times in the loss to the Browns.

In Week 4, Lazor had Cole Kmet essentially acting as an extra offensive lineman in pass blocking and run blocking opportunities. Cole Kmet played a crucial role in helping create a clean pocket for Fields to get through his reads and take shots downfield.

There was also a heavy disparity in run versus pass play-calls (13-29) in the wrong direction for having a bad offensive line that was overmatched and a rookie quarterback making his first start. By comparison, Lazor’s play-calling featured 39 run plays to just 18 pass plays against Detroit. Lazor played through the run game and let other things work as a byproduct of the run game.

David Montgomery was sensational in this role, scoring two touchdowns and rushing for 65 yards on 15 first-half carries, which opened things up for Justin Fields to take some big shots in the vertical game. ...............these concepts all working to perfection: there are some keys that only take place because of Bill Lazor setting the stage with his early play-calling.

In addition to providing Fields with a clean pocket through extra protection, Lazor’s run-first game plan allowed the Bears to gash the Lions on play-action passes. Fields was 5-of-6 for 86 yards on play-action pass calls. I mean, this is Football 101 unless you have the smartest guy in the room syndrome and refuse to do these basic things. Again, this is just Football 101, lined up in the I-Formation, extra protection for a play-action pass with your No. 1 receiver getting downfield, all made possible by marrying the run and pass game and forcing Detroit’s linebackers to play downhill. In the first three weeks of the season, Matt Nagy used two-tight end formations only 18% of the time.

The differences between Nagy and Lazor run deeper than the eye test; the metrics back it up too.

Sharp Football Stats defines a successful play as one that gains at least 40% of yards-to-go on first down, 60% of yards-to-go on second down, and 100% of yards-to-go on third or fourth down. It makes sense, right?

Through the first three weeks of the season, while Nagy was calling plays, they had a 35% success rate on 99 passing play calls. In Week 4, with Lazor building up his passing game on the back of the rushing attack, the Bears had a 50% success rate on passing play calls.

“Yeah, but it’s been one week for Lazor, and it was against the Lions!”

Let’s take a look at the play-calling success rates last season before and after Nagy gave up the play-calling duties to Matt Nagy.

Week(s) 1-10 (Nagy)

•   Rush Play Success Rate: 40%
•   Pass Play Success Rate: 44%

Week(s) 11-17 (Lazor)

•   Rush Play Success Rate: 56%
•   Pass Play Success Rate: 56%

When Matt Nagy was calling plays, there was no balance whatsoever. Nagy was calling passing plays 77% of the time, as opposed to when Lazor was calling plays, and the Bears ran the ball 54.1% of the time.

Here’s where we get into the MAJOR difference in the play-calling, and it’s the most fundamental principle for success in modern-day football: explosive plays. Explosive plays are defined as runs of 15 yards or more and passes of 20 yards or more. With Andy Dalton under center, the Bears have had two explosive plays in 11 drives. That’s one explosive play every 5.5 drives. With Justin Fields under center, even including the disaster last week against Cleveland, the Bears have nine explosive plays in 24 drives or once every 2.7 drives.

The difference in personnel, scheme, and play-calling between Matt Nagy and Bill Lazor is unmistakable, and so are the results.

 

https://www.bleachernation.com/bears/2021/10/05/so-how-different-was-bill-lazors-play-calling/

Butkus never wore an earring

Corn Cob
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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Sage Rosenfelds was on the radio the other day talking about Nagy and his play calling, schemes.

He can't believe Nagy has Fields starting out in shotgun position over 75% of the plays he has called. Sage was making a point about starting in shotgun as the most difficult of any initial formation coming up to the line of scrimmage. He wanted Fields to line up under center to make it easier on Fields with all of his reads presnap and also because of the weakness of the OL.

Nagy just doesn't seem to want to make things easier on the rookie QB.

Matt Nagy: "I know we need to run the ball more. I'm not an idiot."

BamaBear09
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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PapaBear.OR wrote:

 In the first three weeks of the season, Matt Nagy used two-tight end formations only 18% of the time.

This has to be ego then because Andy Reid lives in 12 personnel... KC ran it about 30% of the time last season... so almost a 3rd of their offensive plays were in 12 personnel... but Nagy doesn't seem to even pattern himself after that...

PapaBear.OR
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Re: Lazor No Improvement over Nagy in Play Calling
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BamaBear09 wrote:

 

PapaBear.OR wrote:

 In the first three weeks of the season, Matt Nagy used two-tight end formations only 18% of the time.

This has to be ego then because Andy Reid lives in 12 personnel... KC ran it about 30% of the time last season... so almost a 3rd of their offensive plays were in 12 personnel... but Nagy doesn't seem to even pattern himself after that...

Butkus never wore an earring

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