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PapaBear.OR
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Bears 2019 Draft Thread
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So the Free Agent period is winding down and it's time to start looking towards the draft.  I'm sure there will be plenty of mocks and speculation and one of the hot topics again this year is the RB position.  I'll get us started with this just in:

Matt Nagy and Ryan Pace Spotted Personally Working Out a Prospect

 

Matt Nagy and Ryan Pace are two men of the same kind. They don’t know any such thing as an offseason. They’ve been hard at work since last season ended at Soldier Field against Philadelphia trying to find ways to improve for 2019. Pace did some early work in free agency signing the likes of Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, Buster Skrine, and Cordarrelle Patterson. However, the past several days have been quiet.

Now there may be an explanation. It seems Pace was indisposed, taking time to personally attend the Ohio State pro day on March 21st. He wasn’t alone. Nagy was there too and it appears the two men wished to be there for a private meeting with a particular prospect. His name is Mike Weber, a running back for the Buckeyes.

Garrett Stepien, a staff writer who covers Ohio State, spotted the two men running Weber through drills including Nagy’s personal favorite. A swing pass out of the backfield down the sideline. It’s apparent as ever that the coach is searching for options who can open up that part of his offense.

 

Matt Nagy and Ryan Pace personal attendance says a lot

Weber is an interesting prospect. Weber averaged 5.9 yards per carry in his college career. He had some of his best games against top opponents too including Michigan, Michigan State, and Oklahoma.

Almost everybody agrees that Weber is less a feature back and more of a chess piece that a creative offensive coach can move around the board to create matchups. Given what Nagy did with Tarik Cohen and Taquan Mizzell last year, this makes perfect sense.

https://sportsmockery.com/2019/03/matt-nagy-and-ryan-pace-spotted-personally-working-out-a-prospect/

I could see an addition like this in the draft and I don't think it has to mean Howard is on his way out, but it could.  This and the addition already made of Davis in FA could be Nagy finding a way to replace Mizzell and Cunningham and truely compliment Howards style of running in a way he couldn't last season.  Sharing the load in the backfield in this way could make a lot of sense at least for one more year.

Calbrooks
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Re: Bears 2019 Draft Thread
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*****

So what is it? Why has Pace had such success in this area of the draft? There are lots of variables that go into it, but upon close examination, there is a running trend between all the players mentioned above. They must fill three criteria in order to have a greater chance of success.

#1: Must be athletic

Adrian Amos was a former CB before becoming a safety and time well both in the 40 and the shuttle drills at the combine.
Jordan Howard ran a 4.58 in the 40 at 230 lbs and posted a solid shuttle drill in 4.34 seconds.
Eddie Jackson was not only one of the rangiest safeties in his class, but he was also a great punt returner.
Tarik Cohen posted a speedy 4.42 in the 40 and was clearly one of the most elusive backs in the draft on tape.
Bilal Nichols ran a 4.95 in the 40 at 302 lbs (anything under 5.00 is excellent). He also had a shockingly good 4.44 in the shuttle drill. That’s better than Leonard Williams and Jurrell Casey who are Pro Bowlers.

#2: Must be productive

Adrian Amos had 90 tackles and four interceptions in two years as a safety
Jordan Howard amassed 3,942 yards from scrimmage and 27 TDs in three years.
Eddie Jackson had seven interceptions and three defensive TDs over his final 23 games
Tarik Cohen had 6,564 yards from scrimmage and 59 TDs in four years
Bilal Nichols had five sacks in each of his final two seasons (as a defensive tackle)

#3: Must have a “yeah but” that coaches can fix

Adrian Amos was viewed as too cautious by many
Jordan Howard was not overly agile or a natural pass catcher
Eddie Jackson was recovering from a broken leg
Tarik Cohen was only 5’6, which is really short for any position
Bilal Nichols was accused of never playing with proper leverage

By sticking to those criteria over the past four offseasons, Pace was rewarded with a series of quality pickups. There is also evidence as to why other late picks haven’t panned out. Safety Deon Bush had decent productivity at Miami but his athletic measurements were average both in terms of speed and agility. The same went for former guard Jordan Morgan, who had a terrible 5.36 in the 40 at the combine and a glacial 8.13 in the three-cone drill.

Players can be athletic and fail. They can be productive in college and fail. They’re going to fail if their biggest issues aren’t coachable. However, when all three of those things are checked off the list? History shows the prospect ends up being a success.

https://nflmocks.com/2019/03/23/chicago-bears-how-ryan-pace-has-so-much-day-3-success/

Train like you are 2nd, but play like you are 1st.

PapaBear.OR
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Re: Bears 2019 Draft Thread
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Calbrooks wrote:

 

#3: Must have a “yeah but” that coaches can fix

 when all three of those things are checked off the list? History shows the prospect ends up being a success.

https://nflmocks.com/2019/03/23/chicago-bears-how-ryan-pace-has-so-much-day-3-success/

Seems like only the first two really need to be checked off that list...........

Butkus never wore an earring

PapaBear.OR
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Re: Bears 2019 Draft Thread
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2019 NFL Draft: Ranking position groups, strongest to weakest

1) Interior defensive line: Defensive tackle has been held up as this draft's strong suit, and for good reason -- the position could produce as many as seven or eight of the top 50 players selected in this year's draft. Guys like Quinnen Williams, Christian Wilkins, Ed Oliver, Dexter Lawrence and Jeffery Simmons have received plenty of attention as first-round candidates, and the position's riches will spill into Day 2 of the draft. But the talent pool isn't limitless here. Teams that haven't addressed DT by Friday of draft weekend could be left in a lurch, as there isn't as much depth in the middle to late rounds.

2) Edge: While Josh Allen carries my highest grade as an edge talent, he's way behind Bradley Chubb from last year's class. That said, this year's group is much deeper overall. Allen and Montez Sweat have huge upside, but Nick Bosa might be the safer (though less explosive) option. Depending on whether or not teams reach for rushers, the strength of this position should be from about pick No. 24 until the end of the third round.

3) Interior offensive line: This position is helped out a great deal if Jonah Williams and Cody Ford are included here, instead of at tackle -- which is what I'm doing. Williams offers rare versatility, but many teams see him as a guard or center. Garrett Bradbury leads a list of three centers with instant-impact potential. There is enough guard depth to project a decent number of early starters and future starters headed all the way into the late-fourth and early-fifth round.

4) Offensive tackle: It won't receive as much mention, but this year's group of tackles offers a greater selection of starters and potential starters than we've seen since 2015. Jawaan Taylor and Andre Dillard will definitely go early, while Dalton Risner, Kaleb McGary and Greg Little all have a shot at going inside the top 40. Max Scharping and Tytus Howard are future starters at right and left tackle, respectively, while guys like Dennis Daley and Yodny Cajuste highlight a group of prospects offering good mid-round value.

5) Tight end: If your team needs a tight end, then you are in luck, relative to most drafts. In 2017, three tight ends went in Round 1 (O.J. Howard, Evan Engram and David Njoku), and there is an outside shot that could happen this year. Regardless, T.J. Hockenson, Noah Fant and Irv Smith Jr. are a talented top three, with upstarts like Kahale Warring, Dawson Knox, Jace Sternberger and Josh Oliver adding "future starter" value and solid depth available in Rounds 4-6.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000001024108/article/2019-nfl-draft-ranking-position-groups-strongest-to-weakest

All top 5 are position groups one could argue as an area of need for the Bears imo, whether it be looking for a starter or much needed depth.  Pace has positioned the Bears well going into this all things considered.

Butkus never wore an earring

Calbrooks
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Re: Bears 2019 Draft Thread
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*****

Skrine signed a three-year deal. Haha however only signed a one-year deal. Deon Bush‘s contract is also up after next season. So it’s safe to say did the Bears are going to be looking at safety in this draft class and I think that they can find a really good one in Sheldrick Redwine.

Redwine joined the University of Miami after being a 3-star recruit out of Killian High School in Miami. In his freshman and sophomore years he was used very much as a reserve cornerback and a special teamer. He did start five games at cornerback as a sophomore and recorded 28 tackles and two pass breakups.

After his sophomore year he was moved to the safety position where he joined former high school teammate Jaquan Johnson. He started all 12 games that year and had 59 tackles six pass breakups and two interceptions. In his senior year he racked up 64 tackles three sacks three interceptions but only two pass breakups. For his senior year, he received honorable mention All-Conference ACC.

His strengths are definitely his versatility. In his college career, he started a total of 30 games five at cornerback and 25 at safety. He’s also very patient as a tackler and not afraid to hit.

His weaknesses are very clear. He has trouble forcing turnovers. Over 30 career starts he’s only forced nine total turnovers. Four forced fumbles and five interceptions. It also seems like he would rather make the tackle then deflect the ball. Because he only has 10 pass deflections which is incredibly low.

*****

In Sheldrick Redwine, we know what kind of player he is. Because we literally just had a player like him. Let’s not forget that Amos started all 16 games as a rookie. And Amos only had the privilege of playing next to Eddie Jackson for two years.

Redwine can definitely be a value pick up in the fourth round. And I do believe if the Bears get Redwine they will prove that it was the right choice to let Amos walk. Amos getting $9 million a year while they pay Redwine (a similar player) pocket change has got to be a clear win for the Bears.

https://theloopsports.com/2019/03/30/sheldrick-redwine-could-be-the-bears-replacement-for-adrian-amos/

Train like you are 2nd, but play like you are 1st.

PapaBear.OR
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Re: Bears 2019 Draft Thread
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A fun article from ESPN to help us fans prepare for the draft:

NFL draft glossary:

From surgeons to pilots to carpenters, mechanics and baristas, every profession has its own language. For the next 22 days, the lingo of the NFL draft will be all over the airwaves as analysts, scouts and fans define the difference between Greedy Williams and Quinnen Williams.

In preparation for the draft, here's the ESPN Abridged Draft Glossary.

The Basic Terms

Alligator arms (n., al'i-ga'ter arms): From the American alligator (Alligatoridae mississippiensis), which has an average size of 13 feet and 790 pounds. Because of their short legs, these reptiles' bodies barely move above the ground. In the NFL, the term refers to a specimen who won't extend his arms for a catch for fear of injury. The less common but still funny synonym: T-rex arms.

See also: someone who won't reach for the check

Bend and burst (adj., bend and burst): The bend is what a pass-rusher does when turning the corner on an offensive lineman. The burst is the speed to close the deal. It combines a rusher's flexibility and leverage with speed.

Body catcher (n., bod e kach 'er): Holden Caulfield heard a song "if a body catch a body ..." so maybe that's where draft analysts got this term for a receiver who pins the ball against his body instead of catching with his hands. Then again, Holden got the song wrong.

Antonym: hands catcher

Bubble (n., bub el): The rear, derriere, can, rump, etc. Likely shortened from bubble butt or its derivatives, especially for big guys who move with power. The term "bubble" is used, according to scouts, so scouts and executives can avoid saying "ass" a lot in meetings.

Catch tackler (n., kech tack'ler): A defender whose tackling strategy is to let a ball carrier run into him and hope he falls.

Click and close (adj., klik en klos): From the Dutch for click. The ability to go backward, then forward quickly. An essential skill for defensive backs spending their professional careers doing this cha-cha in cleats.

Cow on ice (n., kow on is): Picture a cow. Now put that cow on ice and make it move. Hilarious. It's a player with no balance who spends a lot of time falling and getting up.

Downhill runner (n., down hil run 'er): Almost exclusively used for running backs. A ball carrier who can power through tackles while almost falling forward and also having the speed to score.

See also: north-south runner; good lean

Fluid hips (adj., floo id hips): Every human has hips with fluid. That's just anatomy. But some players have more to go around. These liquidy joints allow them to change directions quickly.

See also: oily hips

Antonym: tight hips

Glass-eater (n., glas eder): A bad dude. The rest of us might just be avocado toast eaters, or avocado ice cream eaters in Tom Brady's case, but these guys literally eat glass to get ready for NFL games and that makes them extra, extra tough. Usually reserved for offensive linemen.

See also: plays with a mean streak

Go-home gear (n., go-hom gir): The fastest possible speed. The ball carrier whose speed immediately separates him once he has the ball.

See also: extra gear; Deion Sanders

Tight hips (adj., tit hips): See: hips, fluid.

Violent hands (adj., v., vi-elent hands): From the Latin violentus. Not just normal hands, but just like it sounds, it's a player whose hands are powerful enough to move people where he wants with the initial impact.

See also: good punch; active hands

Obscenity-Based Phrases

"Holy s---" tackler: Like the many famous cases before the Supreme Court defining subjective obscenity by visual evidence: You know it when you see it.

L.I.A.: You know the bubble. This is the opposite. Often, this refers to a thin-waisted lineman who needs more lower-body strength. This is scout shorthand for "light in the ass."

See also: Needs some sand in his pants

The Secret Menu Phrases

Couldn't even use a crosswalk: When you're watching a game and there's that defender pacing around, that's it. This describes a defender who repeatedly, as in all the time, has trouble getting lined up before the play.

Thinks he's a soloist, but he can't sing: The misplaced-confidence guy. He is a star and a leader in his mind only.

Trash can full of dirt: From the Latin lutum for dirt. Out of use in some dialects, this refers to, usually, defensive linemen who are hard to move out of the way.

Washcloth tackler: Visualize throwing a wet washcloth against something only to watch it stick briefly and then fall off. This is the guy who ends up sliding off the runners on all the big plays.

http://www.espn.com/nfl/draft2019/story/_/id/26416126/fluid-hips-cow-ice-just-guy-glass-eater-more

 

Dick Butkus was a glass eater, the guy had oily hips for his size and amazing bend and burst, perhaps one of the first ever Holy Shit Tacklers.

Butkus never wore an earring

The Shadow
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Bill Belichick: Tough to project college passing games to the NFL

Posted by Michael David Smith on April 11, 2019, 5:22 AM EDT

Patriots coach Bill Belichick offered some insight into just how difficult it is to watch film of college passing games and project how those players will play in the NFL.

Belichick said the passing offenses in college football are so different that it makes it hard to evaluate not only quarterbacks, but everyone else as well.

“I’d say the issue in college football is there just is not the same passing game in college football that there is in the NFL, period,” Belichick said. “So, it’s hard to evaluate the receivers, it’s hard to evaluate the quarterback, it’s hard to evaluate the offensive linemen, it’s hard to evaluate the pass rushers and it’s hard to evaluate the coverage players. You know, we’re all looking at the same film, so all the teams in the league, we all see the same games. But, the college passing game is very different from the professional passing game. When you’re looking at it, you’re looking at a lot of it’s really projecting all those positions a little bit differently. To a certain degree, it’s different in the running game, too, but probably less difference in the running game than in the passing game, in my opinion.”

College passing concepts are making their way to the NFL and will continue to with Kliff Kingsbury now coaching the Cardinals. But the differences are still significant, and that makes scouting players a challenge.

******

The way BB puts it explains why teams, do what they do, with draft picks. With this in mind, it clarifies the bears thinking when they gave up so much, to move up one spot, to get their guy at QB. It also explains other picks that make fans shake their heads in wonderment at specific moves.

This is why I was all for the AAF succeeding. A Minor League lets teams see prospects in Pro-Style games, versus watching tape of college games that may or may not lend to good draft decisions.

QBs taken in the 1st round are more than likely going to bust out of the League in dramatic fashion, because it is very hard to determine if they are Pro compatible. Some say teams should "bargain hunt" in the late rounds, because BB got lucky once and hit on Brady in the 6th round. To put this in perspective, Brady was a 6th rounder and HOF Kurt Warner was undrafted. Like him or hate him Tony Romo was an UDFA, but had success for several years.  Ryan Fitzpatrick and Tyrod taylor are borderline starters that were taken late.

Mid round picks are highlighted by Russ Wilson, Zack Prescott, Nick Foles, and Kirk Cousins. They are not just examples but more the complete list.

Most NFL starters are taken in the 1st round or top of the second round.

This same dynamic takes place with OT, DE, WR, DB's too. To get an elite player, you almost have to take them high to improve the odds of hitting on a good one. For every late round treasure their are many 1st round busts to go with them.

So with all this in mind this year, I will not hold my breath for a new rookie sensation to appear. For every Howard there is a Benson. For every Cohen, you get a K'Deem Carey.

We will have to wait a couple years to see a complete crap shoot, but until then hopefully they can find some pieces and parts.

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

PapaBear.OR
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The Shadow wrote:

Patriots coach Bill Belichick offered some insight

 

So what Bill is saying then, is that drafting good players is hard.  Am I understanding that right?

Butkus never wore an earring

Calbrooks
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PapaBear.OR wrote:

 

The Shadow wrote:

Patriots coach Bill Belichick offered some insight

 

So what Bill is saying then, is that drafting good players is hard.  Am I understanding that right?

I think so. All that was missing was him saying, “except for me, it’s easy for me”

Train like you are 2nd, but play like you are 1st.

The Shadow
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Re: Bears 2019 Draft Thread
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Calbrooks wrote:

 

PapaBear.OR wrote:

 

The Shadow wrote:

Patriots coach Bill Belichick offered some insight

 

So what Bill is saying then, is that drafting good players is hard.  Am I understanding that right?

I think so. All that was missing was him saying, “except for me, it’s easy for me”

That part was implied, actually BB has missed on many draft picks. His average is about the same as everyone elses except the Brown and Lions. Were BB excels is getting other teams to buy his bad draft picks off him for inflated prices.

Having a lot of tools does not make you a Carpenter.  -Vic Fangio

 

PapaBear.OR
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Chicago Bears: Potential trade scenarios in 2019 NFL Draft

Scenario No. 2: Trade back, acquire additional pick(s)

Pace is an intriguing general manager. He is never afraid to make a deal happen, and there is never any telling which way he will go when it comes to the draft. He’s given up plenty of picks in his day, but he’s also always interested in acquiring more picks.

Some of his best drafting has come in Rounds 4 and 5, where Pace has selected guys like Tarik Cohen, Adrian Amos, Eddie Jackson and Jordan Howard over the years. If he feels the mid-round talent is exceptional this year (depending on who might fall), there is no doubt in my mind that Pace would trade back to acquire more picks. This is especially true because of having so few holes on the roster, therefore Pace doesn’t necessarily have to bank on nailing a high pick in 2019.

4th Round prospects worth trading back for:

Running Back Devin Singletary, Florida Atlantic

Tight End Josh Oliver, San Jose State

Edge Rusher Christian Miller, Alabama

Cornerback Jamel Dean, Auburn

Running Back Trayveon Williams, Texas A&M

Just by these guys alone, you can see why it would be so tempting for Pace to trade back. These five prospects are some of my favorite mid-round guys, but they’re not the only ones. The talent able to be found in Rounds 4 and 5 in 2019 is pretty outstanding. It all depends on if Pace pinpoints a few which possess just a hair more potential than the others.

https://dawindycity.com/2019/04/16/chicago-bears-trades-2019-nfl-draft/3/

Pace really does have a good record of finding talent in these later rounds, I could see a trade back for an extra pick this year as a reasonable strategy if one became available.

Butkus never wore an earring

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